Dealing with “Using Dreams”

Recovery is often a complete upheaval of our life. Our addictions consumed us and determined nearly every aspect of our daily lives. It is only natural that when we give up what was once such an integral part of our life, our subconscious still remembers the familiar feeling of being intoxicated and we have dreams…

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How Long Until I Feel Normal?

It’s important to keep in mind that recovery is a healing process. There is not quick fix for addiction treatment. We must be honest, open-minded, and willing if we want to change our lives for the better and break free from our addiction. Recovery is possible, but it takes time for our mind, body, and…

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Taking it Easy: How Relaxation Can Help Your Recovery

Everyone needs to unwind from the stress of life every now and then. Making time to focus on relaxation and self-care can be crucial in recovery. After all, stress and anxiety were often major factors in our decision to begin using drugs and alcohol. When we take time for ourselves by engaging in relaxing activities,…

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What is Fentanyl?

The increased number of overdose deaths from opiates is due in part to the ubiquity of fentanyl. Many drug manufacturers choose to use fentanyl as a way to strengthen other opiates, but because of the extreme potency of fentanyl, this often leads to immediate overdose upon use. Fentanyl is a synthetic opiate about 80 times…

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How Long Should I Be in Treatment?

Drug and alcohol treatment programs vary in length. The duration of stay necessary to support the maintenance of sobriety is dependent upon the individual needs of the client. Some men and women are able to effectively utilize the tools they develop in treatment to achieve long-term sobriety, while others may have extenuating circumstances or cooccurring…

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Overcoming Self-Pity with Positive Affirmations

Addiction can make us lose our self-confidence and self-worth. We get so caught up in our self-identification as hopeless drug addicts and alcoholics that we begin to play the role of the victim. Often time, the resulting depression causes us to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol, leading us to fall deeper and deeper into our…

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The Link Between Drug Use and Brain Damage

Using drugs, especially over a prolonged period of time, makes severe physical changes to the human brain. While drugs are also capable of altering the brain in the short-term, such as nitrous oxide, frequency and length of use play a major role. Often, many drugs will play a significant role in one’s likelihood of developing…

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Alcohol is the Most Dangerous Drug

Psychoactive substances run the gamut from benign to extremely life-threatening. In 2016, more than 64,000 Americans died from drug overdose. However, there are many more deaths, injuries, and health problems that are influenced by substance use. Taking into account physical, psychological, and social problems caused by drugs, alcohol has been proven to be the most…

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Letting Go of Fear of the Future

Fear keeps us focused on the past or worried about the future. If we can acknowledge our fear, we can realize that right now we are okay. Right now, today, we are still alive, and our bodies are working marvelously. Our eyes can still see the beautiful sky. Our ears can still hear the voices…

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How Dangerous is a Speedball?

When a person combines heroin and cocaine it is known as a ‘speedball’. The combination can be extremely dangerous or lethal because it mixes together a very strong depressant with a very strong stimulant. Heroin depresses respiration while cocaine stimulates the heart, which can lead to simultaneous cardiac and respiratory arrest. Dr. Adam Winstock, founder…

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